Here’s what you need to know about pond lighting

Private Garden at Sunset, Autumn

Whether you’re looking to illuminate a spot, or simply enjoy watching pond wildlife, pond lighting can be a great addition to your garden. Before choosing to install pond lighting, we’ve compiled a list of some of the things you should be aware of.

Mounting your pond lights is a good idea

Pond lights are fairly lightweight and quite buoyant. To ensure your pond lights remain upright and in place, it’s a good idea to mount each one to a brick or piece of concrete. You can do this with a galvanized steel concrete screw and drill.  

Make sure you choose the right bulb

Our pond lights come with a choice of low-voltage or LED bulb. Typically, a low-voltage bulb will last for a few months, while an LED bulb will last much longer. Although LED pond lights are slightly more expensive, they will be much brighter and give a more radiant glow to your pond.

The deeper the pond, the stronger the wattage

Rather than focusing on the size of your pond lights, what really matters is the wattage of your light and how deep your pond is. If you have a very deep pond, you will need a brighter light with a higher wattage to break through the surface of the water. Our low voltage pond light comes with a 20W bulb, while our LED pond light comes with a 12W bulb. Both have the option to add on a bulb with a higher wattage.

Location is crucial with pond lighting

Although there is no right or wrong way to place a pond light, you should play around with the positioning before mounting them. Stand back and admire the way the light shines off of your pond and move them around to get the perfect setup.

Our low voltage pond lights can be fully submerged underwater or left high and dry on land. These versatile lighting solutions are ideal for gardeners with ever-changing landscapes and unpredictable extreme weather. Shop now.

Infographics: The True Cost of Lighting

As you may have read in our previous post, ‘The Benefits of Choosing LED lighting’, choosing energy-efficient bulbs such as LEDs will get you more light per dollar guaranteed. But how does the cost of running an LED bulb compare to using a compact fluorescent lightbulb (CFL) or incandescent light-bulb? We’ve scanned the web to find the best infographics outlining the true cost of lighting.

Image: Lamps.com

 

The first infographic in our selection shows LED lights have the longest average lifespan, have the lowest cost to run over 50,000 hours, and produce the lowest amount of carbon dioxide emissions, although the bulbs are generally more expensive.

Image: Greenprophet.com

Our second infographic focuses on LED lights, and outlines the fact that LEDs contain no UV, mercury or pollutant and are eco-friendly, last longer and save on energy consumption.

Image: Frontrow.furniturerow.com

Infographic three shows lighting facts of LED bulbs, and compares its features to that of incandescent bulbs, halogen bulbs and CFL bulbs.

Image: Next.com

Infographic four gives suggestions on the type of bulb you may need for specific purposes, giving reference to fittings, shapes and life spans.

Our LED outdoor lights are made from heavy duty cast aluminum with either a powder coated or brass finish. Shop now.

4 Ideas for Outdoor DIY Lighting

Decorative Tin Can Lantern on a Wooden Background.

Here at Best Pro Lighting, we stock everything you need to complete a professional looking low voltage landscape lighting design, from directional lights and path lights, to well lights and step lights. But if you’re looking to get a little more creative in the New Year, try these DIY lighting ideas from other bloggers we’ve come across on the web.

Create some fairy magic

Image: The Gold Jelly Bean

For this DIY project, all you need is a glass jar, some glow sticks (which you can buy from any dollar store), some rubber gloves, scissors, and you can also use a piece of tulle (a soft, fine silk, cotton, or nylon material like net). Simply cut open the glow sticks, being sure to put on your rubber gloves for protection, and empty the contents into the glass jar. Replace the lid and shake for instant fairy magic. Check out The Gold Jelly Bean for all the steps.

Give your tin cans a new lease of life

Image: Inhabitat

Instead of throwing old cans in the garbage, give them a new lease on life with this great DIY lighting idea from Inhabitat. First, strip the cans of their labels before hammering small nails into the sides to create holes. Make sure you place some wood inside to prevent the cans from denting under pressure. To create the light, simply drop in a candle.

Ready, set, lights!

Image: Kittenhood

Kittenhood noticed the resemblance between shuttlecocks and lamps and came up with this DIY Shuttlecock Lights Garland. Using a knife to remove the tops of the shuttlecocks, simply weave your lights through, and voilà, a new and improved lights garland, which also incidentally creates a very pretty pattern on the wall behind.

Paper bags can be pretty too

Image: Martha Stewart

 

Household goddess Martha Stewart decided that beribboned colored bags would make great outdoor lights. To make them, cut small slits in paper bags and cover your string lights. Hanging ribbons will add a party vibe when all the Christmas celebrations are over. See the full steps on her website.